The Pendulum of Governance – Green Campaigns

On most sensible accounts, causation only flows forward through time. This is why I am confident to suggest that by maintaining a sustainable appreciation for our local culture and heritage, we will be able to strengthen our National identity and growth as an emerging civilisation.

However, before we embark on such an expedition, we have to first understand what governance really involves and how civil society can contribute to stimulate good governance.

While our inherent concept of civil society derives from an amalgamation of concepts, the very notion of it really suggest the need to facilitate order to a society. In Singapore, our civil society is no less different from the rest of the World.

However, for us to maintain a mature civil society, we need to be able to deliberate on matters that do not implicate personal emotional sentiments over our community’s best interest. Being ‘responsible’ is what makes a mature civil society work, and it requires all areas of the public and private domains to cooperate with each other.

The topic I wish to address in this article reflects the need for civil servants who serve the public domain to responsibly micro-manage our government’s appeal to nurture a ‘green’ mentality amongst Singaporeans. This cannot be achieved over night, but we can always take an initiative to demonstrate our support for such a noble cause.

The picture above was taken during my morning run along East Coast beach. What I am most concern about is the message that was sent through the notice banners placed along the side of the road on the lamp-posts.

 

City in a Garden

“Imagine living in a garden where the community can come together amidst pervasive greenery and thriving biodiversity” – a message on the notice banner.

When we are trying to send a message across to the public that we can imagine coming ‘together amidst pervasive greenery and thriving biodiversity’, we have to make that first step to send the right messages across.

To have a green mentality means that we ought to be environmentally responsible; not to abuse our resources. What I see on my day of exercise at the beach tells me that very little had been taken into consideration when it comes to setting a budget to print those banners.

How environmentally friendly are we trying to project ourselves when we post 30 or more notice banners all along the same stretch of road – especially when they are not spaced out “proportionally”? The purpose of the banners if interpreted correctly is to help spread a greater awareness of the National Environment Agency’s (NEA) project to promote a ‘Green City’.

The issue is not about the 30 notice banners being printed, but the need to strategically space out them out for a greater outreach of audience. As an environmentalist who believes in sustainability, I strongly urge us all to consider our approaches when it comes to green-campaigns.

Consequently, our civil society ought to play our roles responsibly to encourage good governance to take its form. This is especially important, because it projects that type of people that we are and the natures of culture we aspire have or to share with our future generations to come.

I am sure that there are many examples to be shared and I would like to hear from your experience and views on what we should be doing to invigorate our environment.

“Thoughts without content are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind.” – Kant Immanuel 

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Edmond Wong

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