…so Singaporean graduates can’t get a job?

The article below is sent to us by a Japanese reader who wishes to remain anonymous. 

See below for a Japanese transcript. 日本語訳については、以下を参照してください。

 

Last week, I heard an interesting rumor that Japanese run NHK is making a documentary about “How graduates in Singapore CANNOT find jobs”! It seems like some people already got interviewed about this topic.

I’m not sure how accurate that is. The fact is, success rates of graduates from the NUS getting a job see an employment rate of between 80%-100% (most ranging the upper percentiles) within 6 months of their final exam.

From my observations, Singaporeans have many opportunities in the employment market. The jobs here are diverse, interesting and offer a wide variety of wage packages. They cater to a wide variety of skills, abilities and interests.

In fact, I spoke with many business owners and they tell me the greatest productivity killer in Singapore is attributed to employees job-hopping frequently.

Many get better pay and better position every time they switch jobs.

It is difficult to appreciate how good it is in Singapore without some comparison. I can only compare the employment market here with Japan.

In Japan, it is a big deal if we cannot find a job as a fresh graduate. In 2012, 54 graduates committed suicide because they failed to find a job.

Being a fresh graduate means we are the most desired person in Japanese job market, for all the wrong reasons. Because they are fresh and easily get brain washed. Just like some man wants to get married to virgins, Japanese companies prefer fresh graduates and train them from scratch.

A lot of “good companies” only open its permanent employment door to fresh graduates. Therefore, most of Japanese university students put their maximum effort in finding a job before graduation. As soon as we reach our 3rd year in the university, we start giving up on hair coloring and trendy cloths.  Then dye our hair black and wear plain suits called the “Recruit Suit” and start applying for jobs. Let me share with you a viral video about this job finding craze, it will give you an idea what it is like.

Even though we put in so much effort, only about 60% of us could find permanent employment jobs. Then what happen to the rest? Unfortunately, majority of us stay in non-permanent employment for the rest of our career. Once one become a non-permanent employee, only 10-25% of us find our way out to permanent employment within 3 years. This is significantly low compared to most of the developed countries in this world. And unlike Singapore, it is very common in Japan to get lesser pay and benefits every time you change job.

In Singapore, a freshie not being able to find job doesn’t mean that they would stay unemployed or doomed to non-permanent employment for the rest of their lives.

Singapore has only 1.8% unemployment. This means a good 98% of the citizens have jobs. Flip the newspapers and the job-seek websites – there are so many good jobs around. It is a fact that Singapore is an employee’s market, made more so by recent policy changes on foreign manpower.

From my observation, fresh graduates who claim they cannot find jobs – are victims of excessive options. I’ll be downright frank here – complaining there are no jobs here is akin to a girl, looking at her well-stocked closet and then lamenting there is nothing to wear.

I know there are many well-meaning sites offering advice, guidelines and statistics which makes a degree holder think he/she deserves a high position or salary. In the real world, no one “deserves” a high starting salary. It is always your skills and abilities that command what you get.

For this same reason, I know too many a non-graduate or school dropout who have become rich, powerful, successful and influential by their own abilities, without the need of any certification.

I hope the NHK will be very careful in their reporting and not end up making it sound like they have a personal vendetta against Singapore – like how the BBC had done in recent times.

 

Source:

http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/post-secondary/files/ges-nus.pdf

http://blogos.com/article/59239/

 

シンガポールの就職活動は本当に厳しいのか?

 

先週、興味深い噂を耳にしました。なんとあのNHKが現在、「シンガポールにおける新卒の就職活動は厳しい」とするドキュメンタリーを制作しているというのです。すでにインタビューを受けた人々が何人も存在するとのこと。

これは本当なのでしょうか。データによると、シンガポール国立大学を卒業した新卒学生のうち、実に80%〜100%の生徒が、卒業試験から6ヶ月以内に職を得ているそうです

私の目には、シンガポールの人々はたくさんの就業機会に恵まれているように映ります。この国で目にすることのできる求人のバラエティは驚くほど豊かです。様々なスキル、能力、そして興味の方向性を持つ人々を対象とする、ありとあらゆる仕事が用意されています。

事実、私の友人の実業家達は、次から次へと良い仕事を求めて転職を繰り返していくジョブホッパー達にいつもため息をついています。「この国における生産性向上の最大の障害は、頻繁に転職を繰り返す文化にあるのではないか」との意見も聞こえてくるほど。

そして多くの人々が、仕事を変える度により良い待遇を手にしています。

シンガポールのこの状況がいかに恵まれているかを知るために、日本の状況と比較してみることにしましょう。

日本では、新卒時の就職失敗は文字通り死活問題です。一説によると、2012年には54人の若者が、就職失敗を理由に自ら命を断ったそうです。

新卒であるというだけで、あなたは日本の就職市場において一定のイニシアチブを握っています。何物にも染まっていない、真っ白なキャンバスのようなあなたを求めて、多くの日本企業が新卒対象の正社員雇用を行うからです。

新卒時は、普段は閉ざされている多くの「優良企業」の正社員への扉が、大きく開かれる時です。大学生達はこの最大のチャンスをなんとか結果に繋げるべく、涙ぐましい努力をします。大学3年生になるかならないかの頃には、髪の毛を黒く戻し、リクルートスーツに身を包んで、過酷な就職前線に参戦するのです。ここで日本で今バイラルヒットとなっている動画をご紹介しておきましょう。日本における新卒学生の就職活動とはいかなるものかが、よくわかる動画だと思います。

こんなに頑張ってみても、卒業までに正社員の職を見つけることができる学生は、全体の60%ほど にすぎません。では、残りの学生達はどうなってしまうのでしょうか。残念なことに、彼らの多くが、今後のキャリアを非正規雇用のまま過ごすことになります。ある調査によると、一度非正規雇用についた日本の若者が3年後に正社員の職を見つけている確率は、10〜25%程度と、他の先進諸国に比べて著しく低いものでした。更に残念なことに日本では一般的に、転職回数が多くなるほど、就ける職が限られ、条件もまた悪くなっていきます。

シンガポールでは、新卒時に正社員の職を見つけられなかったからと言って、その先のキャリアが非正規雇用の連続になるとは限りません。巻き返しをはかるチャンスが多く与えられているのです。

シンガポールの失業率はわずか1.8%です。約98%の国民が職を得ている計算になります。新聞や求職サイトを覗いてみれば、いつだってたくさんの仕事があなたを待っているのです。むしろ昨今の外国人労働力に対するビザ規制で、シンガポール人の求人市場は求職者に有利な状況となっています。

私が思うに、シンガポールで職を見つけるのが難しいと嘆く新卒学生は、むしろ選択肢が多すぎることで迷子になっている状態なのでしょう。正直に言いましょう。その姿は、素敵な洋服でいっぱいのクローゼットを覗き込みながら、「着るものがないの!」と叫んでいる少女のようです。

ネット上にはたくさんの情報が溢れています。「大卒者はもっと良いポジションや給料を与えられて然るべきだ」とする様々なアドバイスやガイドライン、そして統計の数々を見つけることは難しくありません。しかしこと仕事において、「与えられて然るべき」ものなど無いのです。全ての報酬は、スキルや能力に応じて与えられるものであり、無条件で与えられるべきものなど存在しません。

それを証明してくれるのが、高等教育を受けていない、もしくは中退してしまっても、自らの能力だけで人生を切り拓いている大勢の人々の存在です。彼らの経済的な成功、数多くの人々からの尊敬、そして社会への影響力は、決して卒業証書によってもたらされたわけではありません。

現在作られているというそのNHKのドキュメンタリーが、これらの点を注意深く考慮した上でのものであることを願わずにいられません。どうかそれが−−−−最近BBCが発表した例の作品の如く−−−−ごく一部の、個人的な確執を取り上げただけのものになりませんように。

 

Source:

http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/post-secondary/files/ges-nus.pdf

http://blogos.com/article/59239/

 

Must reads

        »  So you’ve been fired. Now what?
        »  Cecilia Cheung: Cray Cray over CC
        »  Reply to Zing
        »  Ich bin ein Singaporean
        »  Avoid the Politics of hate?

 

 

About the author

Aya Imura

Aya Imura was born and breed in Japan, she attended high school in Utah, USA and furthered in Beijing University, China. Mid way through her studies she had to return home Japan when her family business went under. She became stewardess with Japan Railway Hokkaido before following her interest, and joined “Recruit Co.” one of the biggest publishing and marketing industry player in Japan as a copy-writer. She won several copy writing awards including the prestigious East Japan Best Practice Award.

Aya Imura started building her business in marketing research upon arriving in Singapore and helped Japanese companies increase their awareness and market strategy for both local and S.E.A market. In early 2012, ninjagirls.sg was born with a few like-minded Japanese friends.

They made video blogs about fashion, food, tourism and anything fun under the sun (and even the moon)!

View all posts

6 Comments

Share your thoughts!