FAQ on the National Jobs Bank

 

“My company hire so many [insert nationality] just because he’s from that country also! What is this?! Why don’t hire Singaporeans?!”

With the National Jobs Bank, complaints such as the above will be reduced by a new process designed to nudge employers to consider Singaporeans first.

The Jobs Bank will also provide another platform for job seekers to hunt and look for opportunities, and for employers to access a larger pool of candidates.

The National Jobs bank is launched, we spoke with a couple of readers and found out some of the things that people are not clear about. We’ve compiled a little FAQ about the Jobs Bank for your reading pleasure:

Disclaimer: We are not writing for the National Jobs Bank and neither do we claim to be an authoritative FAQ for them. For clarity, please click the relevant links below and read from their sources.
1. Are all companies operating in Singapore supposed to submit their openings on the portal before they send headhunters out to comb?

Firms submitting EP (Employment Pass) applications are required to advertise their job vacancies via the National Jobs Bank.

For Work Permit or S-Pass holder, you are not required by law to advertise. But you still have to hire fairly. Otherwise the penalties described above will apply.

 

2. If yes, how is the government policing it?

MOM will use the Fair Considerations Framework to police this, read here: http://www.mom.gov.sg/employment-practices/fair-consideration-framework/Pages/fair-consideration-framework.aspx

3. Do job seekers send in their application through the portal? This will allow the government to know exactly the number of applications and question companies why they are not hiring locals who apply.

You can send in your application via the portal, and indeed there exists data that technically allows analysis of applications.
4. From job seekers prospectives, who can use the portal?

Everyone with a Singpass.
5. How are rogue companies and headhunters punished? What are the whistle blowing avenues to bring them to justice.

You can lodge a complaint with the Tripartite Alliance for Fair Employment Practices (TAFEP).

6. How will TAFEP help? Is this a ‘wayang’ act as it has no ‘teeth’?

If a complaint is lodged to TAFEP, companies practicing discrimination to locals will hear from officers by the Ministry of Manpower (MOM). When that happens, the offending company will see themselves put on a blacklist, and slowly, they’ll find their applications for foreign talent rejected.

Or they can use public shaming as in the case of discriminatory job offers.

There are a 101 means of corporate torture tripartite partners can inflict on an offending company. There is no need to institutionalise a means of punishment. Perhaps this is the reason why we were not able to find an official statement that prescribes a course of action. But if you have the chance, speak with officials from the Ministry of Manpower or the NTUC and this will quite likely be what they will tell you.

 

7. It seems to easy to game this system.

Yes, any process and system is subject to loopholes and gaming. It is very easy for an employer to say “oh, we’ve advertised but we can’t just find a Singaporean”. It will be up to MOM to decide if the said company has reasonably considered Singaporeans or not.

Similar systems in tough European and Australian systems are also subject to gaming, not just us.

 

8. Won’t the other job portals such as JobsDB suffer from a lack of revenue?

Well…yes, but that’s their corporate problem isn’t it? lol…

 

 

Must reads

        »  Reality TV shows S’poreans should make
        »  Punggol Nasi Lemak takes on productivity challenge
        »  Are you cut out for entrepreneurship?
        »  What do you do if your salary is held ransom?
        »  Sylvia Lim: “Police will benefit from real-life practice with peaceful protests”

 

 

 

 

About the author

Tay Leong Tan

Tay Leong Tan is a collective of 3 writers. Tay, Leong and Tan. (Who were you expecting?!) We are enthusiastic about labour issues, economics and current affairs in particular.

View all posts

2 Comments

Share your thoughts!