Bus operators compete to offer better pay

Go-Ahead

Competition for human resources heats up amongst local bus operators.

Singapore’s newest bus operator Go-Ahead Singapore raises its minimum monthly salary for its bus captains. The new $1950 starting salary is more than its original $1865 originally decided in February.

Rival bus operator Tower Transit announced recently that a junior bus captain would receive a basic monthly salary of $1930 while SBS Transit raised salaries to $1950.

Mr Nigel Wood, Managing Director of Go-Ahead Singapore, said: “Go-Ahead Singapore is committed to offering all its staff a competitive employment package. Today’s announcement is a tangible example of how much we value our people.”

He adds that “We want to enable our bus captains to grow both professionally and personally, and the updated salary will further complement the existing benefits that are already available to our bus captains.”

National Transport Workers’ Union Executive Secretary Melvin Yong has posted his comments on Facebook.

MelvinYong

“The National Transport Workers’ Union (NTWU) welcomes the move by Go-Ahead Singapore to keep the compensation package for our bus workers competitive. The union has been working closely with our public bus operators to ensure fair and competitive wages, as well as to build a safe and conducive working environment for our bus captains. ”

Melvin Yong also went on to raise a point on the Singaporean core. “We are also pleased to note that Go-Ahead Singapore has recruited many local bus captains in the recent months, with many staying at Pasir Ris, Punggol and Sengkang. They are building a strong Singaporean core in their workforce through their targeted recruitment approach. The union will continue to work closely with LTA and our public bus operators to attract more locals to join us in the public bus industry.”

Image Credits: Labourbeat.

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Tay Leong Tan

Tay Leong Tan is a collective of 3 writers. Tay, Leong and Tan. (Who were you expecting?!) We are enthusiastic about labour issues, economics and current affairs in particular.

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