Heng Swee Keat on Singapore’s Next PM

Minister Heng Swee Keat and the next Prime Minister of Singapore

Minister Heng Swee Keat, who is recovering from a stroke which almost took his life, shared interesting perspectives on the country’s leadership in a recent
interview.

However he declined (unsurprisingly) to comment on who would be the next Prime Minister of Singapore.

Instead, according to the Straits Times, he said that Singapore’s future depends on teamwork:

“It’s not just about your individual work, but it is how we connect with Singaporeans and how we do the right things to make sure we have the right policies that will enable us to navigate to a better future.”

Heng Swee Keat Singaporeans

Make sure we all support one another

And teamwork is not limited to a few at the top.

Minister Heng says:

“A lot of it is really to make sure that we all pitch in and we all support one another, not just the fourth-generation leaders among ourselves, but also with all fellow members of the Cabinet and with the broader institutions in Singapore.

Singapore’s success depends on our unity

Minister Heng also highlighted the trust and confidence that Singaporeans have in the team that will lead the country is important.

“If we are united and cohesive and have a sense of direction, we can get there.”

A country is run by teamwork, not just a team of men

How many men does it take to run a country?

A good politician would probably highlight himself as the defining factor for his country’s success. Take him out of the equation and the promise of success would collapse.

In contrast, a good political leader would highlight structures and systems more enduring than just himself alone, that even if he is taken out of the equation, the system carries on reasonably well under a team of capable successors to steer the country in the right direction.

It is just as well Minister Heng chose to focus on the latter to remind us no island is just one man.

About the author

Jules Of Singapore

I’m Jules, from Singapore. I live and work here, and although it’s a great place to be, I feel there are many issues swept under the carpet. I’m also hoping to meet other women (and men) who actively want to discuss and further the interests of women who make up half our population, but whose voices are not amplified enough.

View all posts

Share your thoughts!