Singaporean ‘charter city’ in Australia might solve the 6.9 million population issue

The space, pace-of-living, weather and natural scenery – what’s not to love about Australia?

About 50,000 Singaporeans live, work or study in Australia and approximately 100,000 Singaporeans have studied in Australian universities.

Given the strong bilateral ties between Australia and Singapore, is the proposal of a Singaporean ‘charter city’ in Australia workable?

Dr Benjamen Gussen, a law lecturer at University of Southern Queensland, tossed the idea of building a Singapore city in Australia. It’ll be governed according to a charter that represents an international treaty.

There are many reasons why Singaporeans would move over but what’s in it for Australia?

The idea of a modern charter city has to be mutually beneficially for the two cooperating countries.

Therefore, in this case, it wouldn’t make sense to build a Singaporean charter city in Perth, Melbourne or Sydney which is already highly populated with Singaporeans.

Dr Benjamen suggested creating a charter city in Dilga, which is a small town in New South Wales.

Four investor groups including Singapore will have a stake in equity and they will draft the basic law together.

After a 10-year transitional period, immigrants will have the right to vote for their government – similar to that of Hong Kong and Macau.

Singaporeans get to live in Australia and Australia gets to further develop other parts of its country such as Dilga (we had to google about this place).

The upcoming report of the Committee on the Future Economy (CFE) is expected to unveil its strategies on keeping Singapore competitive.

It will touch on five areas: digital economy, jobs and skills for the future, Singapore as a connected city, innovation and governance.

Could the idea of charter cities help Singapore achieve the next breakthrough in SG100?

We’re not sure what CFE thinks but here are some Singaporeans who absolutely adore the idea.

Like a dream come true.

Australia boleh.

This must mean a lot because it’s hard to get Singaporeans excited over nation building matters.

What we call “innovation”.

IKR.

About the author

Ling

I am a 90s baby and I spent more than 3/5 of my life being a vegetarian. In my free time, I ponder about the greater purpose in life and how i could live life more meaningfully. I enjoy doing yoga and I daydream about doing headstands one day.

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