Community Gardens: Confessions of a GreenoPhiliac

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Recently, while heading to Chinese Garden MRT station after a visit to a friend, I saw this odd little garden structure being erected. Ever the curious little turkey, I went over. LO-AND-BEHOLD! It was a mosquito infested wasteland!

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Well, okay. I kid. That was the photo I was shown of what the plot looked like 3 weeks before I came by.

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Anyways, I saw a young man tinkering around with one of the plots. Deciding that there ought to be some interesting story going on with this nice little garden, I decided to go talk to the guy there.

 

As it turns out, he’s just sharing the plot with someone else! Doesn’t sound like much till you hear this: He’s actually trying out vermicomposting – that’s breeding earthworms for their poop – and hydroponics.

 

Pretty cool stuff!

 

Anyways, he was a little shy but he was happy enough to be interviewed on what this garden (I found out later that it’s called No Limits) is all about and what he’s doing here.

 

Hi there! How about you introduce yourself?

Hi, I’m Meng Hwee. I work as a research engineer in a research institute. I’m married with a child.

 

Oh? What kinds of research do you do as a research engineer?

I deal with alternative energy and I research on how to integrate alternative energy into the main power grid and what are the issues with large scale integration of such alternative energyt into our grid.

 

So… kind of like turning fart into electricity?

(pause) Yeah. Kind of like that. *awkward laugh*

 

The real question! What got you into contributing into the community garden?

Well, I was walking home one night and saw some people working in the garden. I was curious so I went to check it out and received an invitation to take part.

 

Ah… cool! Cool! In which aspect of the community garden are you contributing in?

I was setting up the worm bin which you can see over here and will be setting up the hydroponics system sometime in the future. I’m intending for it to be powered by solar energy. It’s all in the works.

 

Were there any challenges you faced in the process of working all of this?

I guess the main challenge is time – juggling my work and family with this. Due to the demands of work, I usually come pretty late at around 11 at night. That’s probably the only time I get to work on it. You’re lucky that you managed to catch me today. Everyone has been really helpful in helping me to set up the components though so it’s not all at a standstill.

 

Any perks to being in the garden?

I get to make a lot of new friends and more neighbours.

 

Alright! Random question of the day! You said that you’re married. Do you have any advice for us guys on how to get out of the friendzone/brozone?

Uhhhh… I guess *laugh* I was really lucky. And sometimes you will get lucky too.

 

That sounds… interesting. So, any last words for our readers?

Gardening is fun so I hope to be able to check it out and work more on the things inside.

Oh. And I made this “Do Not Disturb” for Meng Hwee’s vermicomposting bin. Maybe he’ll like it when I pass it to him next time round. :D

 

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Well! That’s quite a surprise to this garden! I’d always thought it was just retirees that’d be involved in this. Turns out that there’re a lot more people working on this than I thought. Stay tuned to the next time when I nab the next person to find out more about this garden and what their plans are!

 

 

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Kornelius

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